improve your posture

How to Improve your Posture

 

How to improve your posture with these 6 Exercise Tips. Want the lean look and elegant stance of yoga or Pilates teacher? It all starts with good posture.

The best way to improve your posture is to focus on exercises that strengthen your core — the abdominal and low back muscles that connect to your spine and pelvis.

Some of these muscles move your torso by flexing, extending, or rotating your spine. Others stabilize your pelvis and spine in a natural, neutral position. Old-style sit-ups used only a few of these muscles, often with jerky momentum. Today’s yoga, Pilates, and core fitness programs target your entire core with slow, controlled movements to get the most out of your workout.

Your Workout Plan to Improve your Posture

Make these posture-boosting exercises a regular part of your routine. Remember to exhale strongly and pull in your core muscles as you work — a fundamental principle in both Pilates and yoga.

1. Core Stabilizer: Single Leg Extensionimprove your posture

Why It’s Good for You: This move trains your core muscles to work together to stabilize your pelvis.

Starting Position: Lie on your back with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor, and hands behind your head. Press your lower back into the floor, and curl your head up off the floor.

The Move: Exhale strongly and pull your navel in and up toward your spine. Slowly pull one knee into your chest, keeping your low back pressed to the floor while extending your other leg straight at about a 45-degree angle off the floor. Keep your abdominals pulled in and your low back on the floor. If your lower back arches off the floor, extend your leg higher toward the ceiling. Switch legs. Start with five to 10 extensions on each side.

Increase the Intensity: Pull both knees into your chest, then extend both legs straight at about a 45-degree angle, using your core to keep your low back on the floor. Or, as you stretch your legs, extend both arms overhead, reaching in the opposite direction from your legs.

2. The New Crunchimprove your posture

Why It’s Good for You: Also called a “curl-up,” this exercise works the rectus abdominis (the six-pack muscle) and oblique’s (which run diagonally around your waist and rotate your torso).

Starting Position: Lie on your back with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Press your low back into the floor. Place your hands behind your head, or reach your arms toward your knees if it doesn’t create too much tension in your neck.

The Move: Exhale strongly and pull your navel in and up toward your spine. Curl your head and shoulders slowly off the floor. Hold, then slowly lower back down. Repeat three times

Increase the Intensity: Extend one leg straight at a 45-degree angle toward the ceiling. Or hold both legs off the floor, knees bent, with your shins parallel to the floor.

3. Pilates Roll-Up / Yoga Sit-Upimprove your posture

Why It’s Good for You: This move works the rectus abdominis, oblique’s, and transverse abdominis (the deepest core muscles that wrap around your waist like a corset and pull your abdomen inward and upward toward your spine.)

Starting Position: Lie on your back with your legs straight, your feet flexed, and your arms reaching overhead on the floor. Press your low back into the floor.

The Move: Exhale strongly and pull your navel in and up toward your spine. Roll up in slow motion, reaching your arms off the floor, then your shoulders and head, rolling up one vertebra at a time until you’re sitting up with your abdominals still pulled in. Slowly roll back down. Repeat the move for three to five reps. Add more reps as your core gets stronger.

Increase the Intensity: Cross your arms over your chest as you roll up.

4. Crossoverimprove your posture

Why It’s Good for You: This exercise works all the core muscles, focusing on the obliques.

Starting Position: Lie on your back with your hands behind your head, your chest lifted off the floor, knees pulled into your chest. Keep your low back pressed into the floor.

The Move: Exhale strongly and pull your navel in and up toward your spine. Pull one knee into your chest while extending your other leg straight and rotating your torso toward the bent knee. Slowly switch legs, pulling the other knee into your chest and turning your torso toward it while extending the opposite leg off the floor. Repeat the move for five to 10 reps. Add more reps as your core gets stronger.

Increase the Intensity: The closer your straight leg is to the floor, the harder the work for your core. Try extending your leg just inches off the floor, making sure your lower back stays on the floor.

5. Cobra Pose: Back Extensionimprove your posture

Why It’s Good for You: This move strengthens the erector spinae (the back muscles that extend your spine and prevent slouching) and other low back muscles.

Starting Position: Lie on your stomach with palms flat on the floor near your ribs. Extend your legs straight behind you, and press the tops of your feet into the floor.

The Move: Exhale strongly and pull your abdominal muscles in and up toward your spine. Lengthen out through your spine and slowly raise your head and chest off the floor, using only your back muscles. Do not push down into your arms to press up. Keep your hip bones on the floor, and gaze down at the floor to relax your neck muscles. Slowly lower back down. Repeat for three to five reps. Add more reps as your lower back gets stronger.

Increase the Intensity: Reach your arms long beside your head. Keep your elbows straight.

6. Plank Poseimprove your posture

Why It’s Good for You: This exercise strengthens the oblique’s and transverse abdominis, as well as your shoulder and back muscles.

Starting Position: Begin on your hands and knees with your palms under your shoulders. Extend both legs straight behind you, toes tucked under, into a position like the top of a pushup. Pull your abdominal muscles in to prevent a “sway back,” and gaze down at the floor.

The Move: Hold the plank until you start feeling fatigued. Rest and then repeat. Keep your abdominals pulled in and up to your low back, so it doesn’t sag as you exhale.

Increase the Intensity: Balance on your forearms instead of your hands.

Tips and Precautions

  • Pull your abdominal muscles in and up toward your spine as you exercise.
  • Work with slow, controlled movements, breathing evenly, without holding your breath.
  • Set the number of repetitions and sets to your current level of core fitness.

Final Thoughts on How to Improve your Posture:

If you suffer from mild back pain, core-strengthening exercises may improve your posture, ease symptoms, and prevent future pain. Talk to your doctor before you start any exercise program if you have severe back pain or injury, are out of shape, or have any medical problems. Some exercises may not be recommended. Stop doing any activity that causes pain or makes pain worse.

I hope you found this article helpful and as always I look forward to your comments, questions and the sharing of ideas.
Note: Thank-you for supporting this site with purchases made through the affiliate links provided.
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References:
Exercises To Improve Your Posture – WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/guide/better-posture-exercises (accessed October 29, 2017).

 

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22 thoughts on “How to Improve your Posture

  1. Man these exercises are great! Have been trying them out for 2 days now and I can really see a difference in my posture! Thank you so much!

  2. It’d be nice if you name some low-impact alternatives for some of the core routines you’ve mentioned here. Just suggesting. 😉

  3. We really have to maintain our posture. I have been having back aches when I am in front of my computer for work the whole day. These tips are so helpful for me.

  4. My friends always tell me that I got a bad posture. And it’s sad because my body got used to being slouch. It became a habiy already. And now correcting it needs a lot of effort.

  5. These are wonderful tips for people like with a problem in posture. Because of poor posture I am experiencing backpain. Thanks!

  6. Thanks for the wonderful tips! I’ve been having problems with my posture and this is a good way to start up things. Gonna show this to my family and friends for awareness and such!

  7. I find this really helpful. Been trying to improve my posture because of back pain so I think I’ll try one of these exercises in the coming days. Thank you for posting this article!

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